Category Archives: art space

Garage Art Quickie

Hi there! This is a semi-quick post because I have to PACK!!! My husband and I are preparing to move from our current apartment (where we’ve lived for three years) to a rental house five blocks away. Distance-wise, it’s a piece of cake. Furniture/packing-wise, it’ll be a drag of course. But space-wise, it’s going to be AWESOME!!!! While the house itself is not that much bigger than our current apartment, new added features include a two-door garage, and giant backyard. Not to mention no-one living above or below us. There are two things that I’m most excited about, and that’s the backyard, and the garage. 2-door garage = art studio. My husband and I are both artists, and the prospect of having a private space that we can turn into our artistic hub is SO EXCITING!!!!!!!! We can’t wait to move in, arrange things, and get creative.

So, for this brief taste of inspirational art smoothie, I’m posting some cool garage-converted-to-art-studio pics that I found on the web. Once we’re settled in, I’ll share a pic of our own!!

The Art of the Garage Art Studio:


There are so many possibilities!!! That said, I need to keep packing. There’s nothing like a little bit of random garage art inspiration to get the wheels turning.

Image Links:

“Art Studio”
Mid City Garage Studio
Step inside the studio of designer Keith Scharwath & writer Alissa Walker
Two-Car Garage Turned Art Studio
Allied Seahorse
Wonderful Garage Door Art
James Marshall.
Movie Magic: Backyard garage turned into lavish Home Theater
the garage-in-the-alley theatre
of a garage theater, lighting rigs, the future and kids
Garages Beyond the Ordinary
The Garage- Charlottesville’s Most Intimate Venue

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The Art of Sitting in an Art Gallery (and watching lo-fi horror films)

So I’m doing a workstudy job of sitting for four hours every Tuesday in an art gallery. This is the first time I’ve ever worked in an art gallery, and lemme tell ya- for the most part, it’s pretty damn quiet. In fact, as I’m writing this blog post now, I’m sitting in the gallery. I can see straight outside all the passerby with their paper coffee cups, earphones and college t-shirts. Some of them glance at the gallery, a few stop, and most walk right by. In the two hours that I’ve been here today, ONE person has stopped in for a VERY QUICK glance at a few paintings while trying to avoid eye contact with me before rushing out again. So, for the most part, I have lots of time to do my own work, like writing spontaneous blog posts and watching lo-fi horror films on youtube.

Here’s a preview of some of the films I’ve been devouring:

“The Stuff” (1985), directed by Larry Cohen

“Plan 9 From Outer Space” (1959), directed by Ed Wood

“Robot Monster” (1953), directed by Phil Tucker

“The Horror of Party Beach: (1960s), directed by Del Tenney

Seriously, I could go on and on, but I think I’ll stop there for now. Four hours is a decent amount of time to watch this stuff.

I’ve been on a crazy old-school horror film kick for the past few months. It’s funny, because for the most part I’ve never been much of a horror fan- I was the kid who had nightmares for months in 4th grade because of the birthday slumber party that screened Ghost. I’m also the type who squiggles uncomfortably at the slightest drop of blood, and who in general is fearful of imminent death that looms pretty much everywhere. Which is perhaps why my recent interest in lo-fi, DIY horror films is more appropriate; i.e. films that are obviously fake. Fake = not real = it probably won’t ever happen. Which is more comforting than, say, current-day films about real-life serial killers and how they managed to actually slaughter real people like you and me. Thanks, but not thanks. I’ll go for the fake puppet monsters and ice cream containers that explode…

Anyway, that’s what I’m doing today in the art gallery. And just in case you were worried about the future of art in the gallery, there have been a few more people who have wandered in since I started writing this blog post. Luckily, most of them have been more interested in the art than talking to me, leaving me to bathe in my own lo-fi horror watching glory.

Dreaming of a live/work artist space

One of my big dreams has always been to have a huge live/work art space to make big pieces of crazy art, host funky performance and art events, AND cook up my Sunday morning pancakes. Ideally, it would also be a space that had a lovely little garden either in the backyard, or on top of the roof. I know that’s not usually how it works- you either get the loft, or get the house with the backyard. But when it’s a dream, it could be anything… Here are a few pics of cool-looking spaces I could envision myself in:

This one is okay, but I don’t love the cement floors. Would have to work on that.. Exposed brick is always a nice look, though. Plus a big open space.

Hardwood floors is more my style, especially old-looking hardwood floors like this one. Anything somewhat raw looking is good.

LOVE this space. Nice light, although the pillars could get in the way for some events..

I could certainly see myself living here, except that it costs a freaking $1,050,000. Artist loft converted to rich person condo :(.

Not sure about living in this one, but it sure looks cool! Plus it’s probably more in my price range…

Another fancy pants one, purchased at $1,000,000. Ugh, why do all the rich people get the good artist lofts? It’s not fair.

LOVE. I actually just applied for an artist residency at this one: (The Bemis Center). That would be a dream come true. Hope I get it. Artist residencies will at least offer the space until I can figure out how to afford one of my own…… someday… !

 

Image Links

http://www.attheedges.com/2009/11/26/sdspace4art-acquires-artist-livework-studio-spaces-apply-now-for-your-own-space/ (At the Edges)

http://jasonbrockert.com/inventory/?p=2914 (Jason Brockert Art)

http://cargocollective.com/315 (315 Linden)

http://sensationalloft.com/info.html (500 Molino Street)

http://maryland.inetgiant.com/baltimore/addetails/artist-looking-for-industrial-loft-type-live-work-space-baltimore/12886197 (iNetGiant)

http://www.mpfcorp.com/madison_park_live_work_lofts.html (Madison Park Financial Corporation)

http://www.bemiscenter.org/ (Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts)

Art Without Art Spaces

A hard part about being an artist is finding the right space to do so in. Rehearsal space, space for making things, space for thinking about making things… all these things are needed but space is limited and to have space you have to have $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. Artists have to become increasingly creative in the ways that they find space to make things in. This is why Site-specific art work makes more and more sense. Not only does it bring itself directly into the public sphere, not contained in a traditional art space, but it also saves big coins in the wallet, if you know what I mean. As space is limited, I feel pushed to search for a new means of creating artwork that does, indeed, fit outside the box.

Image Sources: http://www.greektravel.com/greekislands/santorini/ (Galleries and Wineries in Santorini), http://web.ncf.ca/ek867/2009_03_01-15_archives.html (Prague Warehouse), http://www.today.ucla.edu/portal/ut/challenging-the-concepts-of-art-96002.aspx (Robert Smithson’s “Spiral Jetty” in the Great Salt Lake), http://www.guardian.co.uk/stage/theatreblog/2007/apr/26/sitespecificworkneedsmoret (The National Theatre of Scotland and Grid Iron’s production of Roam, performed at Edinburgh airport.)