Tag Archives: Jan Svankmajer

On second thought, food IS art.

So after I wrote my blog post yesterday about how I was much more inclined to cook up some food than make some art, I realized that I had neglected the fact that food, indeed, is a bona fide ART FORM. In the context of yesterday, food was more about EATING for me than making anything artistic. However, I agree that food in itself can be an awesome outlet for artistic expression.

In lieu of that, today’s blog post is dedicated specifically to the amazing ART of FOOD. Included below are some impressive food art examples:

Artist Carmen Wong’s pizza in a pill, part of her artwork Tactile Dinner Car, an immersive interdisciplinary art and food experience:

For more information about Tactile Dinners, visit this website: http://www.banishedproductions.org/portfolio/tactile-dinner-long-view-gallery/, along with a review: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/14/AR2010051405170.html.

La Figa Visions of Food & Form by Chef Tiberio Simone with photography by Matt Freedman:

Tiberio is a friend of mine from Seattle and has been working on his La Figa book project for several years. Born in Southern Italy, Tiberio runs his own catering business La Figa Catering, wowing arts and public audiences alike with his amazingly delicious food creations and artistic sensual food visions. Find out more about his book here: http://www.lafigaproject.com/the-book, along with his catering company: http://lafigacatering.com/home.html.

Food Fight: An abridged history of American-centric warfare, from WWII to present day, told through the foods of the countries in conflict:

Not only is this video an excellent combination of food and stop motion animation, it also provides a breakdown of the actual battles portrayed in it. For the breakdown, visit the creator’s website: http://www.touristpictures.com/foodfight/index.htm (tourist pictures). AND, stay tuned for more stop motion and food amazement down below.

Here are a few more images of the ways that food has been artistically manipulated:

And lastly, I can’t go without including the work of one of my favorite artists of all time, Jan Svankmajer, who amazingly explores the themes of food and consumption in most of his work:

Jan Svankmajer: Food, Part 1 (1992)

Jan Svankmajer: Food, Part 2 (1992)

I LOVE Jan Svankmajer’s work. It’s absolutely amazing. I could watch his Food videos over and over again.

And that, my friends, is my blob post dedication to the ART of FOOD.

Image Links:

http://eyelevel.si.edu/2011/09/luce-center-pizza-in-a-pill.html (Luce Center: Pizza in a Pill?)

http://kate-campbell.blogspot.com/2011/08/food-as-form-decorating-human-body.html (Food As Form: Decorating the Human Body)

http://www.worldoffemale.com/food-as-art/ (Food as art)

http://weirdspy.com/food-art/ (Food Art)

http://www.digitalbusstop.com/greatfood-art/ (Great Food Art)

http://www.deepfun.com/2004/03/edible-art-and-aesthetics-of-fun.html (Edible Art and the Aesthetics of Fun)

Stop Motion + Lo-Fi Awesomeness

I am IN LOVE with stop motion animation mixed with live action in film. I’m also obsessed with lo-fi quality, the kind of lo-fi that is obviously fake but offers the magic of using your imagination (*gasp*) to believe it. Here are a few of my favorite examples:

Alice in Wonderland by Lou Brunin, 1949. This film is magical. The cardboard sets are so theatrical, the flicker of the film so old. The scene where Alice is swimming in her tears is amazing- so obviously green-screened and yet so wonderful. The young actress who plays Alice’s hair is obviously bleached blonde. The world of the Queen, all red, is fantastic. Watch this whole film. Go on, watch it. It’s worth it. Move over, pixel animation!!!

Food, Part 1 & 2 by Jan Svankmajer. Czech surrealist filmmaker Jan Svankmajer is my idol. I LOVE LOVE LOVE his work. It’s the perfect combination of live acting and stop motion animation. It’s dark and humorous. It’s disturbing and beautiful. I have watched his films over and over trying to figure out how he does it. Truly a brilliant artist. Watch his films. Watch all of them. Now.

The Blob, 1958 version. Oh, the Blob. How I love it so. It’s like a cross between a big piece of red jello and strawberry jam. And yet, it keeps getting bigger and bigger! Here’s a horror film that I’ll actually watch. Why? Because I can still believe that it won’t actually happen. And despite that, it still holds the exciting suspense that horror films should, without the grossness of being too realistic. I’ve seen the advertisements for the newer 1986 version of The Blob, and it just looks disgusting. Yes, perhaps I should actually watch it to know for sure, but I prefer the older version, there’s just something about it and lo-fi films in general that excite me more than the newer ones.

Has the art world progressed too much for its own good? Has increasingly fancy technology turned it to the shit? Or, am I just too nostalgic for the past? What do you think?